Editorial Reviews

"It’s time to review the system and ask questions like “How effective are these services?”, “Are the intended benefits genuinely reaching troubled kids?”, “What problems need immediate attention?”, etc. In this book, the author does the extremely valuable task of performing a detailed review and giving us an update. Happily, she tells us that as regards foster care, excellent outcomes outweigh the bad, though some serious flaws exist that need immediate intervention., it’s time to review the system and ask questions like “How effective are these services?”, “Are the intended benefits genuinely reaching troubled kids?”, “What problems need immediate attention?”, etc. In this book, the author does the extremely valuable task of performing a detailed review and giving us an update. Happily, she tells us that as regards foster care, excellent outcomes outweigh the bad, though some serious flaws exist that need immediate intervention.
Recycled Childhood challenges and invites all who are compassionate to help — all those whose hearts bleed for injustice and suffering in an uncaring world. You may not do much, but doing whatever you can without procrastinating is of utmost importance. If you cannot become a foster parent, you can donate money, volunteer help, or even just report cases of child abuse you notice to Child Protection Services. I also recommend this book to members of the collaborative workforce that’s involved in child protection and welfare services — clinicians, caseworkers, psychosocial researchers, criminal justice systems, insurance companies, policymakers in Gov, etc. It will provide an update and inspire them to close gaps, plug holes, etc., and work better towards the cause of children’s welfare."
                                                                                                                                                              Raju Chacko, Reedsy Discovery

Readers Reviews

It's a shame what happens to these children. Never understood why reunification is the primary goal. Once a child has settled in at a loving foster home, (which is a difficult process, per the book), why is it in the best interest of the child to be reintroduced to their formerly dysfunctional home, where it is likely that the parent will relapse? Seems to me that adoption should be the ultimate goal.
This book casts a very negative (although probably true) picture of the challenges faced by foster parents. Takes a special person, which I am not. Heartbreaking, but enlightening!

                                            -                                                                                                                              Janice K (Recycled Childhood)

Every now and then we hear on the national news of an absurd case of abuse by parents or adoptive parents but the portrayal of foster care that the writer exposes is an eye-opener to a system that has never quite gotten right to protect innocent children in this country. Very well written! I couldn't put this book down.

- Sandra Brown (Recycled Childhood)

Compelling and powerful. Easy to read but hard to forget. If you are a Millenial or a Gen Z fed up with your life, you should read it to gain a new perspective. We are used to complaining about everything, but this book makes you stop and reassess your position, maybe enjoy what you have. This book is not describing an issue taking place thousands of miles away. It is happening now and next door. If we did not care before, we should now.

- Christopher Kwinta (The Lost Boys from Longwood)

It’s been a hot minute since I had time to read. I had a particularly rough placement so I felt the call to educate myself on foster care (new foster mom here). I gave my kindle a search and this came up. I read every spare second, I had during the day because I didn’t want to put this book down. I finished in two days (I work full time & raise 4 kids - it was worth making the time). After I was finished, I wanted to keep reading. Absolutely amazing read for anyone interested in learning more about “the system”.

                -                                                                                                                                Bridgett Rundall (Recycled Childhood)

A fast and engaging read, full of compassion for the boys housed at Longwood.
Makes one seriously question the intentions and effectiveness of state programs directed at the young wards of the state. J.C. Pater does a great job involving the reader in the boys' life stories. Highly recommended for anyone, not just social workers, teachers, or counselors.

                    -                                                                                                                                 HS (The Lost Boys from Longwood)

Excellent writing. The writer takes you from story to story while intertwining them all together to make an incredible book. To think that these are real-life stories is incredibly sad. It’s riveting. Definitely an eye-opener for people that don’t get to see what true struggles these children went through and the workers behind it all (good and bad). Must read.

- Marine CJ (The Lost Boys from Longwood)

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